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The ability to take a melody and combine it with chords to create a solo arrangement is an important skill that every guitar player should know. This lesson shows how to build a simple arrangement of a song in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process.
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Many players are comfortable in the 1st position—they know the notes and can play a few licks. But the farther up the neck they go, the more unfamiliar it becomes, and they’re not too sure which note is which.
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Whether you read music or not, every guitar player needs to know the notes on the instrument. You’ve got to know where a C is and where an Ab is. Much of guitar playing is going to be done in the first, or open, position so that’s a great place to start.
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Wouldn’t it be great to be able to look at any place on the guitar neck and automatically know the note names?
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Everything wears out if you use it...even guitars. One of the common wear-out points is the jack (at both ends of the guitar cord--amp and guitar). It will first get scratchy, then begin dropping signal. At that point, it's got to be fixed. In this lesson, presented by master tech, Greg Voros (author of the course, Learn & Master Guitar Setup & Maintenance), you'll learn how to do this simple repair yourself. Enjoy!
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After repeatedly tuning, playing, and replacing the strings on your guitar, there are certain components that will eventually wear down or wear out. The nut is definitely one of these components, and when it wears to the point that the open strings buzz, this lesson offers a quick fix. This is a simple repair that you can probably do yourself, presented by master tech, Greg Voros (author of the course, Learn & Master Guitar Setup & Maintenance). Enjoy!
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In almost every studio recording session I'm in, whether on acoustic or electric, I tend to derive my ideas from a basic set of chord shapes. These chord shapes combined with a few chord substitution rules make for great sounding guitar parts. I call these chords the "money chords" and they have certainly put food on my table more than once. These are the nuts and bolts of great sounding guitar parts whether you are playing for your enjoyment or laying down the intro for a Grammy-winning artist's song in the studio.
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Have you ever said to yourself, "All my solos sound the same. It doesn’t matter what key I'm in, I always play the same licks." You've fallen into the age-old guitar player's trap of being locked into playing in positions. The good news is that you can break out of it and begin playing with a new freshness and life to your sound. All it takes is viewing your guitar from a new perspective.
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If you’re serious about being a musician, then there is only one road that will get you there—practice. Practicing is a necessary key—really the only key—that will unlock the potential inside you to become the guitar player you want to be. Practicing is something you’re going to be doing a lot to become skillful, so let’s learn how to do it most effectively.
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Harmonics are one of the best things you can do on a guitar! Few instruments can provide such an unusual but musically useful technique. With a little practice, they’re pretty easy to play and produce a beautiful chime or bell-like tone. If you’ve ever heard a guitarist suddenly play these high bell-like sounds while just barely touching the strings then you have heard harmonics. Harmonics can be utilized in several very musical ways. This lesson covers how harmonics work and how to play natural harmonics, false harmonics, and harp harmonics, in addition to giving you several great licks to use along the way.
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Open strings—one of the coolest things you can utilize in your playing to get some great sounds relatively easily! Combining open strings with hammer-ons and pull-offs can create a wide variety of sounds that only a guitar could make happen. This lesson covers several ideas using open strings that can be worked into your own playing to create sounds ranging from Fingerstyle to Celtic!
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The ability to break out of the tight little circle of open chords and a few comfort zones will cause your playing to explode. Don't be hemmed in to only a few positions. Learn to use the whole fretboard in this lesson.
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The Money Chords in D In almost every studio recording session I'm in, whether on acoustic or electric, I tend to derive my ideas from a basic set of chord shapes. These chord shapes combined with a few chord substitution rules make for great sounding guitar parts. I call these chords the "money chords" and they have certainly put food on my table more than once.
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“It’s 1465!” shouted the bass player as the bandleader counted off the tune. I did my best to keep up and play the guitar part as we began the tune. On that bandstand many years ago was my crash course in the Nashville Number System. Since that time I’ve seen, used, and written this notation numerous times.
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“It’s 1465!” shouted the bass player as the bandleader counted off the tune. I did my best to keep up and play the guitar part as we began the tune. On that bandstand many years ago was my crash course in the Nashville Number System. Since that time I’ve seen, used, and written this notation numerous times.
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This lesson covers some of the important "money chords" in the key of E that make up great sounding guitar parts. Learn some new forms and start creating the sounds you hear everyday in songs.
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Have you ever been learning a song and come across an unfamiliar chord? What do you do? Most will look to find the specific chord form needed, play the song, and move on. But, if you don’t take the time to relate the new chord to a form you already know, then you end up with an isolated chord form in your knowledge with no reference to be able to use it in another setting. Wouldn’t it be great if you could take a form that you already know and just adjust a note here and there to make the chord needed? This lesson shows you a little bit of chord magic—how to build many chords from one base form from which all others are derived. Grab your guitar and let’s learn a little bit of chord magic!
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Restringing Your Acoustic Guitar Does your guitar sound lifeless? Has it lost that sparkle in the sound that it once had? Do your strings feel "gunked" up? If so, then it’s time to change your strings! Changing your strings is the quickest and most inexpensive way to make an immediate improvement in your tone. Plus, it is one of the most basic items of care for your acoustic guitar that every guitarist should know how to do.
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Do you know what separates good rhythm guitar players from great ones? It’s the ability to look at the same G-C-D chords and create musical “magic” instead of just strumming the old stand by open chords that every other guitar player plays. This lesson covers a simple, creative way to take a simple progression and create guitar “magic” by using triads and their inversions. So, grab your guitar and let’s leave the world of boring open chord rhythm strumming and create some great rhythm guitar parts!
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Getting the Most from Your Strumming Strumming is something that only a guitarist can do. No keyboard or drum machine can copy the sound of a great guitarist strumming open strings. Good strumming technique can add rhythm, accents and excitement to your playing. And, if you are working with a singer, learning how to strum comfortably is a must. This lesson covers some important keys to take your strumming to the next level.
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