USA: 1-800-4GIBSON
Europe: 00+8004GIBSON1
GibsonProductsNews-LifestyleStoreLessonsCommunity24/7 Support

Double Tracking How to Bring Guitars Out In a Mix, Part II

Here are some audio clips of how doubling can fatten a track and give you a bigger sound.
MIX 1  Drums, Bass, Elec. Guitar and Acoustic Guitar. This is the original track with no doubles or enhancements.
MIX 2  Drums, Bass and Elec. Guitar. I made a duplicate track within my software program and shifted the track over 40 milliseconds.  I will call this track Elec. Guitar 2.
Elec. Guitar 1 was panned Hard Left and Elec. Guitar 2 was panned Hard Right and shifted over 40 milliseconds. This creates a sort of fake double/delayed sound.
(Tip:  Make a copy of a track and shift the copy track to the right 10 milliseconds, then pan the original track to the left while panning the copy track to the right.  If you don’t know how to do this, I will be explaining how to in a future blog.)
MIX 3   Drums, Bass, Acoustic Guitar 1 and Acoustic Guitar 2. Acoustic Guitar 1 is the original Acoustic Guitar in MIX 1. Another track was recorded mirroring the performance of the 1st Acoustic Guitar track.
MIX 4   Drums, Bass, Acoustic Guitar 1, Acoustic Guitar 2 and Acoustic Guitar 3. Acoustic Guitar 1 is the original Acoustic Guitar in MIX 1. Acoustic Guitar 2 is the 1st double we added in MIX 3. Another track was recorded mirroring the performance of the 1st Acoustic Guitar track- this one we will call Acoustic Guitar 3.
The Acoustic Guitars are panned as follows: Acoustic Guitar 1 Hard Left, Acoustic Guitar 2 Hard Right,
Acoustic Guitar 3 Center. This is a really big wide sound and what we will use in MIX 5 the final Mix.
MIX 5   Drums, Bass, Elec. Guitar 1, Elec. Guitar 2, Acoustic Guitar 1, Acoustic Guitar 2, and Acoustic Guitar 3
Next time I’ll be going in to more detail on “Editing Guitar Tracks with Digital Audio Software”

Posted: 4/8/2009 9:09:50 AM with Comments | Add Comment | Email Link | Permalink
blog comments powered by Disqus