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Fun With Capos

Peter Hodgson
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07.02.2014

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I remember the first time I ever saw a capo. One of my school teachers had one on a twelve-string guitar while she was playing a song at a school assembly. I was probably about 8 years old and already interested in guitar, but there was something about what she was singing and playing which made me associate the capo with wimpy songs played by old ladies (she was probably only 25, really, but to an 8-year-old that was ancient).
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Five PA System Myths Busted!

Craig Anderton
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04.24.2014

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Let’s look at PA systems—where the amount of myth-making can be pretty substantial.
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Five Ways I Was Wrong About Automatic Tuning

Craig Anderton
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04.17.2014

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I first became seriously involved with Gibson because of the HD.6X Pro hex guitar, and even put a two-piece band together based on it. Then one day Henry Juszkiewicz, Gibson’s Chairman and CEO, called to say if I liked the HD.6X Pro, I was really going to like Gibson’s latest development—the Robot Guitar. “Craig, it’s a guitar that tunes itself!”
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What the Heck is PLEK?

Ted Drozdowski
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04.17.2014

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New Gibson guitars have a reputation for dialed-in, off-the-shelf playability. To fine-tune and assure that highly desirably quality, Gibson has invested in state-of-the-art fret-dressing PLEK machines. The first two arrived at the Gibson Custom Shop in 2006, but as of this year every instrument built by both Gibson USA and the Custom Shop will benefit from the PLEKing process.
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The “Memphis Science” of Volume and Tone Controls

Craig Anderton
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04.04.2014

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The Historic Line from Gibson’s Memphis division not only brings legendary semi-hollowbody guitars to life, but also pays attention to a detail that few, if any, other guitar manufacturers have considered: how to take advantage of inherent differences among level and tone potentiometers (a potentiometer is a type of variable resistor).
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Ultimate Gibson Add-Ons

Michael Leonard
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04.03.2014

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At its most basic, an electric guitar need only be some wood, wire and a single pickup. But there are many ways and mods that can supercharge your sound or just make your Gibson guitar play more efficiently. Here are just a few…
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Tuned Coil Tap: Gibson Re-Invents the Pickup Coil Tap

04.03.2014

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Traditional coil taps provide the same effect as reducing the number of windings on a single coil pickup, which gives a thinner sound with less output. While coil taps have their uses, they’re not very common, as most guitarists don’t consider the sound all that desirable.
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Take Your Pick: Wacky Guitar Pick Substitutes

Peter Hodgson
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07.21.2012

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Guitarists typically fall into one of two categories: pick or fingers. Oh sure, occasionally players from one camp will dabble in the other, or they might combine both options into one hybrid picking style, or maybe they’ll use both hands on the neck at the same time, Stanley Jordan-style. But as far as guitar goes, pick or fingers are really your only two choices when it comes to sounding the note on the guitar.
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Road Rig Maintenance: 10 Tips to Keep Your Gig Rig Alive and Well

Ted Drozdowski
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07.19.2012

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Sweating the small stuff can help a lot when it comes to being gig-ready, especially in situations where you’ve got to set up your amplifier and pedal board, plug in, and play. Preventative maintenance is the secret – although it shouldn’t be one – to making sure that you look and sound professional every time you and your band get on stage.
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There's More Than One Way To String An Axe

Peter Hodgson
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07.09.2012

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Guitar starts with the string. Woods are important; so is the neck profile, the fretboard radius, the neck joint, the fret finishing and the electronics. But none of that would mean anything without a well-crafted string. The player interacts with the string via their pick and fretting hand, then the string interacts with the pickup by disturbing its magnetic field, and then after the sound has worked its way through an amplifier and speaker, that same energy pushes the string to greater heights of sustain. Here are a few tips to get the most out of your strings, especially if you use a Les Paul-style guitar.
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