USA: 1-800-4GIBSON
Europe: 00+8004GIBSON1
GibsonProductsStoreNews-LifestyleLessonsCommunity24/7 Support
The Gibson Guide to Guitar Effects Ultimately, a craftsman is only as good as his tools. But a guitarist who knows his way around a sonic toolbox has the power create a virtually endless palette of sound. To help you better understand the world of guitar effects — and how to get the most out of them — Gibson.com is proud to bring you "The Gibson Guide to Guitar Effects."

Reverb
Reverb
There’s a reason why people sing in the bathroom: Those hard, tiled surfaces bounce sound waves back and forth, creating reflected sounds that provide a sweet accompaniment to your voice. So if you ever said, “But it sounded great when I was singing in the shower”...you were right!
Click Here To Learn More


Delay
Tremolo

HELLO   Hello   hello   hello...

That’s the stereotype of echo—a sound being repeated over and over, with each repeat getting weaker until the sound dissipates completely. This is different from reverb, which is more of a “wash” of sound.


Click Here To Learn More


Tremolo
Tremolo
Tremolo is the pulsing effect that powered the signature guitar sound of Bo Diddley in the '50s, the rhythm guitar in Pink Floyd's "Money," and more recently, the intro to Green Day's "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" and the rhythm behind Audioslave's "Gasoline." Sure, you can get tremolo by turning your volume control up and down, with perfect rhythm, 4-7 times a second — but it's a lot easier to do it electronically.
Click Here To Learn More


Compression
Compression
Want more sustain? Reach for a compressor, which is like an invisible hand on your volume control. Compression amplifies soft signals to make them louder, and attenuates loud signal signals to make them softer. This gives a more consistent, sustained level.
Click Here To Learn More