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More on Being Satisfied with What You Know

As you continue to grow as a musician, it’s always critical to make the most of what you know at any given time. This will only serve to help you learn even more as you go along, and make you a better teacher too, if that is also part of your musical makeup. I feel that it is important to “exhaust” as many possibilities as possible from any given technique or style before you move on to the next higher level of whatever it is you are doing.

Sometimes, this happens right “in the moment”, as it often did for me. A good example would be like when I was doing some guitar solo overdubs for someone’s recording, and they would keep making me do more and more takes. This, although it can be a frustrating process, can also cause you to “hyper-exhaust” possibilities rather quickly, since you are trying many ideas over and over again, and usually as a response to another very specific request! You know, the old “hey, can you play that more like Clapton?, “ or “can you remember what you just did, and give it a more complex ending?” These kinds of things, although sometimes maddening, can also serve as a good training ground for the fledgling guitarist, and if you keep a positive attitude, as I always tried to do, it can’t help but make you a better player! I helps you “think on your feet”, which is the single most important tool for any aspiring player who really wants to be an improviser. The act of “thinking on your feet” again is something that can apply whether you have 20 years of experience, or 2 weeks of experience…it’s all up to you to maximize this as much as possible, and to please yourself, as well as the audience, the producer or whomever else you may be involving in your creative process.

So once again, hang in there, and be sure to fully utilize what you know, to the maximum of your creative abilities. It’ll always pay off in the long run!


Posted: 4/19/2010 5:12:39 PM with Comments | Add Comment | Email Link | Permalink
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